Sacramento Life Center Receives $10,000 for Medical Services for Low-Income Pregnant Women

By Kristin Thébaud, Kristin Thébaud Communications  |  2019-05-17

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - Sacramento Life Center in Arden has received $5,000 each from the Leonard Family Foundation and Kelly Foundation to provide free medical services to low-income pregnant women and teen girls through the group’s primary clinic located in the Arden area and its Mobile Medical Clinics that travel throughout the Sacramento area.


“We are grateful to the Leonard Family Foundation and the Kelly Foundation for this generous funding,” said Marie Leatherby, executive director, Sacramento Life Center. “The Sacramento Life Center has seen a 30 percent increase in women and teen girls seeking our services since our move to Arden. The majority of them are low-income, and half have no medical insurance. These grants will help thousands of mothers and their children receive the medical care they need.”


The Sacramento Life Center’s mission is to offer compassion, support, resources and free medical care to women and couples facing an unplanned or unsupported pregnancy. The Sacramento Life Center’s licensed Sac Valley Pregnancy Clinic includes a primary clinic and two Mobile Medical Clinics that provide all services for free, including pregnancy tests, STD tests, ultrasounds, peer counseling for men and women, education and resource referrals.


The nonprofit also offers a school-based teen education program, a 24-hour hotline and a program for women seeking support after having an abortion. For more information about the Sacramento Life Center’s Sac Valley Pregnancy Clinic, visit www.svpclinic.com.


For more information about the Sacramento Life Center or to make a donation, visit www.saclife.org.
Source Kristin Thébaud Communications

AUBURN, CA (MPG) - Placer County Health Officer Dr. Robert Oldham has been reappointed to California’s Tobacco Education and Research Oversight Committee, where he has served since 2015.

The legislatively-mandated advisory committee is charged with overseeing the use of Proposition 99 and Proposition 56 tobacco tax revenues for tobacco research, control and prevention education. Oldham and other members provide advice to the Department of Public Health, the University of California and the state Department of Education. The committee also publishes and periodically updates a state master plan for tobacco control and research.

“I am privileged to continue to serve in this role, and there is important work ahead,” Oldham said. “Use of e-cigarettes is on the rise nationally and locally among youth, and we need to be vigilant to protect our young people.”

The Food and Drug Administration recently announced that use of e-cigarettes among high school students nationwide skyrocketed in just the last year, spurring an advisory from the U.S. Surgeon General this week. The percentage of high-school-aged children who reported using e-cigarettes within the past 30 days rose by more than 75 percent between 2017 and 2018, and use among middle-school-aged children increased nearly 50 percent.

In Placer County, nearly a quarter of 11th graders reported having used an e-cigarette in 2018 — significantly higher than the number smoking whole cigarettes. But teens who smoke e-cigarettes are statistically much more likely to start smoking cigarettes, also.

E-cigarettes are devices that heat a liquid into an aerosol that the user inhales, or “vapes.” They are unsafe for children and young adults, as most contain nicotine, which is addictive and can harm adolescent brain development.

“There is a misperception out there that e-cigs are harmless water vapor, and this is absolutely untrue,” Oldham said.

Parents and community members can find more information and tools to use with children and teens online at e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov.

Additionally, Placer County was recently awarded a U.S. Department of Justice grant to increase tobacco enforcement in schools. Those interested in learning more about tobacco prevention and control efforts in the county are encouraged to contact the Tobacco Prevention Program at 530-889-7161.

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SilverSneakers Fitness Program Improves Older Adult's Physical and Mental Health

NewsUSA  |  2018-02-15

For more information about SilverSneakers, go to www.silversneakers.com.

(NewsUSA) - Joanne C. was 74 when she had a stroke two years ago that left her paralyzed on the entire right side of her body. She refused to

accept that she'd end up in a wheelchair and began rehabilitation, determined to get her life and

body back to where it was before her stroke.

Joanne's hard work paid off. She has regained much of her strength and movement and

can walk again. In large part, she credits her SilverSneakers exercise classes - offered through

her HumanaChoice® PPO, a Medicare Advantage preferred provider organization (PPO) health plan - as key to her successful recovery.

Being a SilverSneakers member helped keep Joanne in good physical condition before

her stroke. "SilverSneakers helped me be familiar with many of the exercises they had me do in

physical therapy and gave me the confidence and strength to persevere through a difficult rehab

process," Joanne says.

Numerous studies, including Tivity Health's SilverSneakers Annual Member Survey of 2016,

confirm that exercising, especially with others, improves older adults' physical and mental

health.1,2, 3

However, there are challenges that prevent many Medicare beneficiaries from joining gyms and

fitness classes.

By offering SilverSneakers through its Medicare Advantage (MA) plans, Humana is

working to overcome those barriers so more people with Medicare can benefit from

exercising.

For those on a fixed income, joining a gym can be expensive. SilverSneakers

provides gym access at no additional cost to many of Humana's MA members across the country,

including those in Florida and Texas. SilverSneakers has partnered with almost 14,000 fitness and

wellness centers around the U.S. and, with national reciprocity, SilverSneakers members can go to

any one of those facilities.

The program is designed with the Medicare population in mind and taught by

certified instructors who offer classes and modifications for all fitness levels. These instructors

are specifically trained to help members avoid stress-related injuries to muscles and

joints.

There's also a wide variety of classes offered, including circuit training, yoga,

Latin dance and even an outdoor boot camp. SilverSneakers members also have access to all of a

facility's amenities, which can include a range of exercise equipment, weight rooms and swimming

pools.

"According to Tivity Health's annual survey, SilverSneakers has made a significant

difference in the lives of many of our Medicare Advantage members, not only in their physical

health, but also in their social life," says Lauri Kalanges, M.D., Humana's Medical Director

of Medicare Products for the Mid-Atlantic Region.

Tivity Health's Annual Member Survey of 2016 found that 91 percent of SilverSneakers

participants reported an improved quality of life. SilverSneakers has had a substantial impact on

the health of its participants, reducing hospitalizations and the risk of depression.3

For more information about SilverSneakers, go to www.silversneakers.com.

Humana is a Medicare

Advantage HMO, PPO and PFFS organization with a Medicare Contract.  Enrollment in any Humana plan

depends on contract renewal.  This information is not a complete description of benefits. Contact

the plan for more information. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply. Benefits may

change each year.  SilverSneakers is not offered on all Humana MA plans in all areas.

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(NewsUSA) - Many people assume that it is a normal part of the

aging process, but no one should resign themselves to foot pain.

According to the The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA), some foot problems

are hereditary, but many others result from cumulative neglect and abuse. Gaining weight can affect

bone and ligament structure. In fact, women suffer four times more foot problems than men, and a

lifetime of wearing high heels can leave a painful legacy.

Normal wear and tear alters foot structure. With age and use, feet spread and lose

cushioning. According to the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, one-sixth of nursing home

patients need assistance to walk, while another one-fourth cannot walk. Seeking professional

treatment for foot pain can help senior citizens enjoy a higher quality of life, not to mention

increased mobility and independence.

"Foot pain can limit a senior citizen's ability to participate in social

activities or work," said Dr. Ross Taubman, president of the APMA. "Even worse, foot problems can

lead to debilitating knee, hip and lower back pain."

Podiatric physicians serve in foot clinics, nursing homes and hospitals across the

country, where they help keep older patients on their feet. The APMA offers these tips to older

Americans hoping to walk pain-free:

-Remeasure your feet every time you buy new shoes. Feet expand with age, so you

can't assume that your shoe size will remain constant. Shop for shoes in the afternoon -; feet

swell through the day.

-Keep walking. Feet strengthen with exercise, and walking is the best exercise for your

feet.

-Choose your legwear carefully. Don't wear stockings with seams. Never wear constricting

garters or tie your stockings in knots.

 

-Bathe your feet daily in lukewarm water. Use a mild soap that contains moisturizers.

After washing your feet, pat them dry and massage them with lotion. Inspect your feet for redness,

swelling and cracks or sores, which require a doctor's attention. Do not cut off corns, and only

trim nails straight across.

-See a podiatrist at least once a year. For more information, visit APMA's Web site at

www.apma.org.

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New Ways to Improve the Way You Feel

StatePoint Media  |  2018-01-29

(StatePoint) Nearly 25 million Americans experience daily physical discomfort, according to the National Institutes of Health, which can affect mood, mobility and quality of life.

While the reasons for discomfort vary, the way it is experienced doesn’t -- peripheral nerves are responsible for delivering sensory information, such as itch, temperature change and physical pressure to the brain.

With this in mind, experts are identifying new ways to promote nerve health and comfort by inhibiting inflammatory compounds in nerve cells, and at the same time, encouraging healthy neurotransmitter levels in the brain.

They have discovered that a fatty acid called palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), produced naturally by the body as part of a healthy inflammatory and immune response, inhibits the secretion of inflammatory compounds from mast cells, a type of white blood cell. As we age, our number of mast cells decreases, causing our remaining mast cells to work harder. That can make them overly sensitive, activating inflammatory processes linked to nerve discomfort.

“By inhibiting inflammatory compounds released by mast cells, PEA promotes the body’s natural response to uncomfortable nerve stimuli at the cellular level,” says Michael A. Smith, M.D., senior health scientist and spokesperson for Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based Life Extension.

Smith points out that it is now possible to take PEA in supplement form. One option is Life Extension’s ComfortMAX, a dual-action nerve support supplement which contains both PEA as well as Honokiol, a naturally occurring lignan compound derived from magnolia that is shown to support “calming” receptors in the brain, known as GABA receptors, which affect the way the brain perceives discomfort.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and these products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease, however, many experts believe they can be effective in pain management. More information can be found at www.lecomfortmax.com.

“It’s only natural to think topically or locally when we wish to inhibit discomfort. However, taking in the bigger picture could mean more effective relief,” says Dr. Smith.

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7 Tips for Managing Diabetes

Family Features  |  2017-12-12

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

(Family Features) Staying healthy can be a challenge, especially for those living with diabetes. Everyone can have conflicts finding the right balance of partaking in healthy habits, such as exercise, eating well and even keeping your teeth and gums clean. From stress to self-care, life can be up and down when you’re living with diabetes.

These seven tips from Dr. Natalie Strand, the winner of season 17 of “The Amazing Race” who lives with diabetes herself, can help you stay healthy and lead a balanced life while managing your diabetes.

Communicate with your care team. Make sure you connect with your nurse educator, endocrinologist and dietician. Reach out to them with your questions as they can often help you implement subtle changes to avoid completely overhauling your lifestyle and routine because of diabetes.

Get involved. Get a local group together to fundraise, vent or just understand each other. Groups such as Diabetes Sisters, JDRF, TuDiabetes and BeyondType1 offer ways to connect with others living with diabetes in person or on social media. Connecting with the diabetes community can be a powerful way to help ease the burden of living with diabetes. 

Keep doing what you love. Just because you have diabetes doesn’t mean you have to give up doing what you love. Make efforts to continue sports, travel and other hobbies, even if there is a learning curve to adapting with diabetes at first. 

Maintain good oral health. People living with diabetes are two times more likely to develop gum disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Colgate Total toothpaste is FDA-approved to help reverse and prevent gingivitis, an early form of gum disease.

Get into a routine. Find a routine that works and stick with it. This way you don’t have to make new decisions each day. Anything that can ease the mental burden of diabetes can help. For example, pick a time each year for your annual visits: eye doctor, endocrinologist, renew prescriptions, etc. Picking the same time of year every year can help ensure you don’t forget to take care of yourself.

Make self-care a priority. It can be hard to keep diabetes care in the forefront. It can be boring, exhausting and also fade into the background. Remind yourself that one of the best things you can do for yourself, and for your loved ones, is stay healthy. Use your family as motivation to exercise daily, eat better-for-you foods and maintain a healthy weight. 

Manage stress. Diabetes can be a big stressor. Add jobs, kids, relationships and it can become overwhelming. Find an easy and effective tool for stress relief and do it often. Even 5-10 minutes of guided meditation daily can have a big impact on stress management. 

For more information and ways to lead a balanced life with diabetes, visit OralHealthandDiabetes.com.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

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3 Ways Pups Can Improve Seniors’ Health

Family Features  |  2017-12-12

Photo courtesy of Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

(Family Features) Furry friends can play a significant role in pet owners’ lives. The old saying goes, “dogs are man’s best friend,” and research shows they may be more than that. In fact, they just might be the key to keeping seniors active.

According to a study conducted by the University of Lincoln and Glasgow Caledonian University in collaboration with Mars Petcare Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition, dog owners 65 and older were found to walk over 20 minutes more a day than seniors who did not have canine companions at home.

The study documented three key conclusions:

  1. Dog owners walked further and for longer than non-dog owners.
  2. Dog owners were more likely to reach recommended activity levels.
  3. Dog owners had fewer periods of sitting down.

“Older adult dog owners are more active than those without dogs and are also more likely to meet government recommendations for daily physical activity,” said Nancy Gee, human animal interaction researcher at Waltham. “We are learning more every day about the important roles pets play in our lives, so it’s no surprise that pets are now in more than 84 million households. It’s great to recognize how pets can help improve seniors’ lives.”

Walking with your pup can help both the pet and owner get in shape. Pets can keep older adults active and even help them meet the recommended public health guidelines for weekly physical activity. According to the study, on average, dog owners more often participated in 30 minutes a day of moderate physical activity and achieved 2,760 additional steps.  

However, the benefits of pet ownership go beyond physical activity. It’s no secret that pets provide companionship. From reducing rates of stress, depression and feelings of social isolation, pets can play a significant role in improving people’s lives, which ultimately can make pet owners happier and healthier.

Not only do pets serve as companions in their own right, studies have shown that dog owners can get to know their neighbors through their pets. Pets can even help facilitate the initial meeting and conversation, which may come as no surprise for many dog owners who have chatted with others while walking their dogs. For older adults who live alone or in a group facility, having a pet is also a great way to build relationships with others.

As senior citizens are celebrated on upcoming days that acknowledge older adults, it turns out living with a pet can be a healthy choice for seniors in more ways than one.

For more information on the benefits of pet ownership, visit bettercitiesforpets.com.

Photo courtesy of Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com

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